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Displaying 1 to 30 of 41

State of the Cybersecurity Nation: Legislation and Europe’s Security Professionals

With both the threat landscape evolving rapidly and regulatory requirements becoming more demanding, organisations are struggling to prepare for cybersecurity incidents.

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  • 104

Unit 42 Report - Ransomware: Unlocking the Lucrative Criminal Business Model

Download the report to learn about the rise of ransomware, how adversaries are refining and improving their tactics, and what you can do to better defend your organization against them.

Santa Clara, CA, USA
  • 1
  • 8138

Protecting Your Clouds.

In this research report, we present the results of a recent Tech Pro Research survey, asking CBS Interactive’s readers about their current cloud activities, security operations, and priorities. You'll learn how IT departments are planning their implementation of private and hybrid cloud infrastructure, how they're dealing with concerns about insider threats, their perceptions of shadow IT, and how you can protect your organization in a challenging threat landscape.

Santa Clara, CA
  • 1
  • 36

The Meaning of Security in the 21st Century

The Meaning of Security in the 21st Century uncovers the root causes of security threats and steps companies can take now to prevent them.

  • 0
  • 120

Credential-Based Attacks: Executive Advisory Report

Credential theft is the oxygen of malicious activity: nearly always there, necessary, but never noticed. According to the 2016 Verizon® Data Breach Report, 63 percent of confirmed data breaches leveraged credentials, and the use of stolen credentials is the most common approach in web-app attacks. Credential theft is a staple in the playbooks of sophisticated attackers, like the Sofacy threat actor group, and unsophisticated attackers alike.

Santa Clara
  • 0
  • 123

Credential Theft: Shamoon 2

Credential theft is the oxygen of malicious activity: nearly always there, necessary, but never noticed. According to the 2016 Verizon® Data Breach Report, 63 percent of confirmed data breaches leveraged credentials, and the use of stolen credentials is the most common approach in web-app attacks. Credential theft is a staple in the playbooks of sophisticated attackers, like the Sofacy threat actor group, and unsophisticated attackers alike.

Santa Clara
  • 0
  • 125

Credential-Based Attacks

Credential-Based Attacks: Exposing the Ecosystem and Motives Behind Credential Phishing, Theft and Abuse In this white paper, Unit 42 details the ecosystem behind how adversaries steal and leverage legitimate credentials to break in and move laterally within the organization, often bypassing security controls. Learn the key attack methods currently in use, how this technique fits into attacker playbooks, and real-world guidance on preventing successful attacks.

Santa Clara
  • 0
  • 1878

Executive Advisory Report - Exploit Kits

As recent headlines illustrate, malicious actors are improving their ability to compromise organizations with increasing usage of automated tools to scaletheir attacks. The malware distribution mechanism that malicious actors are coming to rely on in order to generate profits from their activity, like holding files for ransom or stealing information for resale, are exploit kits. Exploit kits are server-based frameworks that automate the exploitation of vulnerabilities on target machines, most commonly while victims are browsing the web. While an increasingly urgent challenge, exploit kits can be thwarted with the right security technology and risk management processes. Unit 42, the Palo Alto Networks® threat intelligence team, recently released an in-depth report on exploit kit history, evolution and effective defenses.

Santa Clara, CA, USA
  • 0
  • 690

SILVERTERRIER: The Next Evolution in Nigerian Cybercrime

Unit 42 tracks Nigerian Threat Actors and finds they've evolved into capable and formidable adversaries successfully attacking major companies and governments.

  • 0
  • 616

Exploit Kits

Exploit kits, which first became popular in 2006, are used to automate the exploitation of vulnerabilities on victims’ machines, most commonly while users are browsing the web. Over the past decade they have become an extremely popular means for criminal groups to distribute mass malware or remote access tools (RAT), because they lower the barrier to entry for attackers and can enable opportunistic attacks at scale. To understand this phenomenon, we must understand the ecosystem that surrounds exploit kits, including the actors, campaigns and terminology involved.

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  • 2981

Exploit Kits

Exploit kits, which first became popular in 2006, are used to automate the exploitation of vulnerabilities on victims’ machines, most commonly while users are browsing the web. Over the past decade they have become an extremely popular means for criminal groups to distribute mass malware or remote access tools (RAT), because they lower the barrier to entry for attackers and can enable opportunistic attacks at scale. To understand this phenomenon, we must understand the ecosystem that surrounds exploit kits, including the actors, campaigns and terminology involved.

  • 1
  • 5596

Preventing the Blocks to Cybersecurity in Business

We surveyed decision-makers in the UK, Germany, France, the Netherlands and Belgium to understand how they plan to adjust to the changing world of cybersecurity.

Santa Clara, CA, USA
  • 0
  • 513

NSS Labs
2016 Data Center IPS Recommendation

It’s exciting when we’re recognized in the market as the security vendor customers can count on to protect their users and their data. Now, we have a third-party report that publicly corroborates what our customers have been saying: that Palo Alto Networks is effective when it comes to protecting the data center.

  • 1
  • 2644

Ransomware: Unlocking the Lucrative Criminal Business Model

Read Unit 42's in-depth report on ransomware history, evolution and effective defenses.

Santa Clara, CA, USA
  • 0
  • 1329

Executive Summary - Ransomware: Unlocking the Lucrative Criminal Business Model

The business model behind crimeware has changed. In the past, attackers typically profited from their malicious endeavors by stealing identities, or credit card numbers, and selling them on underground markets for a small fee. In recent years, the price for stolen records has plummeted, falling from $25 per record in 2011 to only $6 in 2016.1 This has necessitated new sources of income for cyber attackers, with many of them turning to ransomware due to recent advances in attack distribution, anonymous payments, and the ability to reliably encrypt and decrypt data. Unit 42, the Palo Alto Networks® threat research team, reviews the past, present and future of ransomware in this report, including strategies for preventing this critical threat.

Santa Clara, CA, USA
  • 1
  • 2048

KeRanger - Executive Advisory Report

On March 4, 2016, Unit 42, the Palo Alto Networks® threat intelligence team, identified the first ever fully functional ransomware targeting Mac® OS X® users.

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  • 954

New OS X Ransomware KeRanger Infected Transmission BitTorrent Client Installer

On March 4, 2016, Unit 42, the Palo Alto Networks threat intelligence team, identified the first ever fully functional ransomware targeting Mac OS X users. KeRanger has the ability to encrypt and prevent access to sensitive files, and demands a $400 ransom payment to restore access. The emergence of KeRanger represents a continuation of the ransomware threat observed in the broader attack landscape, and is a reminder that all platforms are subject to malicious activity.

  • 0
  • 943

CryptoWall

Palo Alto Networks’ Unit 42 and the Cyber Threat Alliance identify and track CryptoWall “ransomware” campaign responsible for extorting $325 million. Information sharing by the Cyber Threat Alliance better protects customers and the community from threats like CryptoWall, one of the most lucrative criminal campaigns on the Internet. Download the Executive Advisory Report to learn about how to protect your organization from ransomware.

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  • 535

Application Usage and Threat Report (AUTR)

Unit 42, the Palo Alto Networks threat intelligence team, recently released its annual Application Usage and Threat Report (AUTR), presenting an in depth analysis of the security implications of software application usage across organizations. They identified explosive growth in the use of unauthorized, cloud-based (SaaS) applications, potentially introducing new security risks to these organizations. Download the report to learn how to safely secure your organization’s SaaS application use.

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  • 571

Scarlet Mimic

The Palo Alto Networks threat research team, Unit 42, has spent the last seven months investigating a series of attacks, determining that they are the result of a long-standing cyber espionage campaign. The campaign, which we refer to as “Scarlet Mimic,” has activity dating back over four years. The result of our analysis has allowed us to connect a series of disparate attacks into a coherent picture of the Scarlet Mimic operation, which has targeted human rights activists, as well as organizations with knowledge about these groups, including government entities.

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BackStab: Mobile Backup Data Under Attack From Malware

Unit 42 has recently identified malware exploiting an attack technique we have named “BackStab,” in which attackers can capture private information from backup files stored on a Windows PC or Macintosh. Under default conditions, iOS devices plugged into a computer running iTunes may create an unencrypted backup file that contains many types of private information. Forensics experts have known about these backups for years and have used them to capture phone data without requiring direct access to the phone. We have found that malicious attackers are now using malware to steal data using this same technique.

Santa Clara, CA
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  • 1438

Application Usage and Threat Report

The AUTR provides visibility into the real-world threat and application landscape, helping security teams to understand how adversaries are attempting to attack organizations around the world and build proactive, actionable controls. Built by the Unit 42 threat research team, the report correlates data from more than 7,000 enterprise organizations, providing broad visibility into critical trends.

Santa Clara
  • 29
  • 7525

Operation Lotus Blossom

Operation Lotus Blossom describes a persistent cyber espionage campaign against government and military organizations in Southeast Asia. The report exposes the targets, tools, and attack techniques, and provides full details on the Lotus Blossom campaign, including all indicators of compromise. Unit 42 discovered these attacks using the Palo Alto Networks AutoFocus platform, which enables analysts to correlate the results of the hundreds of millions of reports generated by WildFire.

Santa Clara, CA
  • 11
  • 5168

CoolReaper: The Coolpad Backdoor

CoolReaper: The Coolpad Backdoor New research from Unit 42 confirms security risk in Coolpad devices Palo Alto Networks researchers have uncovered CoolReaper, a backdoor contained in millions of Android devices sold by manufacturer Coolpad. CoolReaper exposes users to potential malicious activity and appears to have been installed and maintained by Coolpad despite objections from customers. Due to the unique way Coolpad modifies the Android OS, it is difficult for Android antivirus programs to identify and remove this backdoor.

Palo Alto Networks, Santa Clara, CA
  • 0
  • 11109

Threat Landscape Review

Unit 42's Threat Landscape Review examines data from WildFire™, a key component of the Palo Alto Networks threat intelligence cloud, to identify how organizations in different industries are targeted and affected by malware.

Palo Alto Networks, Santa Clara, CA
  • 0
  • 3638

WireLurker: A New Era in iOS and OS X Malware

Read the report about WireLurker and its potential impact, and get recommendations for preventing and mitigating WireLurker and other iOS and OS X malware threats.

Santa Clara, CA
  • 0
  • 24920

Application Usage Risk Report Oct 2008

The Application Usage and Risk Report (Fall Edition, 2008) from Palo Alto Networks provides a view into enterprise application usage by summarizing application traffic assessments from 60 large organizations across financial services, manufacturing, healthcare, government, retail and education. The assessments were conducted between April 2008 and July 2008, representing the behavior of over 960,000 users consuming more than 63 terabytes of bandwidth. The report supports the notion that employee application usage within the enterprise is akin to the wild west where anything and everything is fair game.

Palo Alto Networks, Santa Clara, CA
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  • 109

We Know It Before You Do: Predicting Malicious Domains

Malicious domains are key to the success of nearly all popular attack vectors, supporting malware distribution, command and control (C2) server hosting and traffic distribution. One increasing trend is that many malicious domains are only used for a very short period of time; hackers favor the practice because they can easily evade detection and also keep their expenses low with domains so cheap to register. In this paper we propose a solution to the problem that predicts malicious domains so they can be proactively blocked before or right at the point of their initial use.

Santa Clara, CA
  • 1
  • 987

419 Evolution

In the past three months Palo Alto Networks has identified a series of attacks emanating from Nigerian actors against our customers in Taiwan and South Korea. Our team is tracking this activity under the code name Silver Spaniel. These attacks have deployed commodity tools that can be purchased for small fees on underground forums and deployed by any individual with a laptop and an e-mail address. Read the report by Palo Alto Networks Unit 42.

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Unit 42 Threat Landscape Review

Today’s cyber attackers utilize an increasingly sophisticated set of evasion tactics. Disjointed techniques and a fragmented security approach leave enterprises prone to risk. The volume of attacks is rising, applying strain on a limited population of security specialists. It is essential that defenders and security specialists understand the trends and distributions in the attack landscape. This paper takes a survey of the Palo Alto Networks Threat Data generated across the customer base.

Palo Alto Networks, Santa Clara, CA
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Displaying 1 to 30 of 41